2022 Combined Flock Book

Please find below breed descriptions, which are in the flock book.
SOAY BREED DESCRIPTION
The Soay is the most primitive breed of sheep and belongs to the Northern short-tailed group of breeds. The average weight of mature ewes is 25kg (55 lb) while rams average 36-38kg (80-85 lb). The animals are fine-boned and late maturing, with prominent withers. The tail is short and thin. The wool is soft and fine, but hairy fibres are usually interspersed among the wool fibres. The staple length is 5-8cm (2-3 inches), and the Bradford Count is 44-50. The fleece is shed naturally. Rams develop a thick hairy mane. The wool is either chocolate or fawn, and animals may be either whole-coloured or show the ‘Mouflon’ pattern. Chocolate brown and the ‘Mouflon’ pattern are dominant. Some black animals occur and these are always self coloured. There may also be white marks on the face, poll and lower legs, and occasionally piebald. The face and legs are brown or tan, with lighter marks over the eyes and on the muzzle and the lower jaw. The face is ‘dished’.
Rams are usually two-horned and the horns are strong although some scurred animals do occasionally occur. Ewes are either two-horned, scurred or polled.
BORERAY BREED DESCRIPTION
The Boreray is a primitive breed of sheep of the Northern short-tailed group of breeds. Mature ewes weigh approximately 30kg (65 lb) and they stand approximately 55cm (22 inches) at the withers. The tail is short.
The wool is predominantly cream or light-tan in colour, with a small proportion of sheep having grey or dark brown wool. (On occasion animals can be born completely black or with large patches of black but these usually grow cream or light-tan or occasionally black). There is sometimes a dark rump patch, and a dark collar particularly in rams. The wool is shed naturally by July in the breed’s natural environment. The face and legs are black, tan, or grey, often with dark blotches on a white background. Both sexes are usually horned and the horns of the rams are large and spiralled. Ewes may occasionally be scurred or polled